Plants and Animals

Our region has a multitude of iconic and unusual plants and animals. Together with our many partners, we work to protect our region’s special species.

We work in conjunction with universities, government departments, local councils, volunteer groups, peak industry bodies and other non-profit organisations to reduce the threats to our native plants and animals, including those that are threatened or endangered. Our projects include activities such as nest and habitat protection, weed and feral animal control, monitoring and awareness-raising.

Here are just a few of the species and ecosystems we work to protect across the Fitzroy Basin.

Marine turtles

Posted on September 22nd, 2015

Our region’s waters, beaches and islands provide foraging and nesting […]

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Boggomoss snail

Posted on November 20th, 2014

The boggomoss snail is a medium-sized snail characterised by a relatively thin, semitransparent shell.

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Fitzroy River Turtle

Posted on May 8th, 2013

Fitzroy River turtles grow up to 25 centimetres long, are oval-shaped, are medium to dark brown in colour (with darker blotches) and have distinctive white eyes.

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Northern Hairy-nosed Wombat

Posted on May 8th, 2013

A strong and heavily built marsupial that grows to about 35cm high (on all fours) and up to one metre long. It’s the largest of Australia’s wombat species. As the name suggests, these endangered wombats have lots of short brown hairs covering its nose.

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Capricorn Caves fern

Posted on May 8th, 2013

The Capricorn Caves fern survives in thin pockets of soil in the walls and floors of limestone caves, sometimes deep within the cave where light penetrates only occasionally.

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Bridled Nailtail Wallaby

Posted on May 8th, 2013

Bridled Nailtail Wallabies are macropods. Macropod means big foot (all the better for hopping with!). Macropods are marsupials in the family Macropodidae, including kangaroos, wallabies, tree-kangaroos, bettongs, potaroos and pademelons.

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Byfield Matchstick

Posted on May 8th, 2013

Found only on a few headlands from Stockyard Point to Shoalwater Bay on the Capricorn Coast, this small bushy shrub is listed as vulnerable under the Australian Government’s EPBC Act.

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Capricorn Yellow Chat

Posted on May 8th, 2013

Capricorn Yellow Chats feed, nest and breed at Twelve Mile Creek, just south of Rockhampton, not far from Marmor.

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Pisonia grandis

Posted on May 8th, 2013

Pisonia grandis are large-leafed woody shrubs or trees found almost exclusively on Indo-Pacific islands broadly between the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn.

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Australian snubfin dolphin

Posted on May 8th, 2013

The Australian snubfin looks a bit different to other Australian dolphins, with its distinctive rounded forehead and small ‘snubby’ dorsal fin. They vary in colour across their body from dark to light brown and white and grow to between 1.5 and 2.7m in length.

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